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September 14, 2011

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gary rith

Does this relate? NPR was just talking about cultural differences, as in, financial means and backup plans, and how that effects whole groups of people, making it harder for some to climb out of poverty. No safety net, no expectation of going to college. Basically, the point I would emphasize is, many of us are luckier than others and need to keep that in mind, and be careful not to judge too quickly.

Jenrantsraves

As someone who has worked on both ends of the spectrum, with low income families in Head Start, and with wealthy families as a nanny, I can tell you that there are some appalling parental choices being made by everyone! My heart aches for children so much of the time.

Busy Bee Suz

Her comment is SO right!!!! I will go check out the links now.

aaryn b.

The reasons some parents don't provide adequately for their children are myriad, and not just limited to the choices we can all see from two feet away. There are cultural, societal, economic and psychological factors at play, and to say that someone has no right to "get a weave" (whether said on a blog or in a real life conversation) is not only a remark based in racism, but an absurd over-simplification of an evermore insurmountable problem in our country, one that those with the power (i.e. white people) do not care to address. It is a comment of privilege with little to no historical- or self-awareness.

Aunt Snow's comment here (as well as on the original post at DWM) is eloquent and clear and begins to get at the issues. I said as much over at DW manor on the now-removed post, when I countered both Commentor A and the anonymous person who later used the n-word (you can read my take on it hereif you want). Yes, I am Commentor B and as always, I commented using my real name, as I always do. I have nothing to hide.

To be clear, I did not fling any accusations, nor did I comment anonymously. I just called a spade a spade. I pointed out what was so egregiously wrong with the arguments put forth by both Commentor A and the n-word using woman, both teachers. But when you point out that a comment has tinges of racism, many people shut down, and this is part of the problem. We all have our biases and prejudices, and it is a lifelong process to unlearn them, but we must talk about them and be painfully honest with ourselves in order to do the unlearning.

Certainly, teachers need to be unlearning their biases yesterday. Children do not have the luxury of time to be in a system with teachers who are biased---consciously or subconsciously---against them (take 50 minutes and watch this).

And, too, while teachers are under tremendous amounts of pressure, they should not be taking to the internet to denigrate their students or their parents, as Commentor A was doing on her own personal blog, which I visited after the whole kerfuffle. A teacher doing such a thing is betraying those in her care, and is as unacceptable as if a psychiatrist or a lawyer did that with clients.

mom taxi julie

I was going to post on the TP but it's gone so I'll post that here

I think it's funny :) We've had it done to us once (in retaliation) but my daughter had to clean it up since it was her fault ;)

Aunt Snow

Jenn, I missed seeing you quote me until today!!

Thank you!

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